Jun. 07, 2019

Join Me at a Spotted Lanternfly Seminar

 

 
Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program Vouchers Available


The Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program provides $20 in free vouchers to eligible Monroe County senior citizens in an effort to encourage older consumers to eat fresh fruits and vegetables produced by local growers.

The Monroe County Area Agency on Aging administers the program, which is made possible through the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Food Distribution.

Monroe County residents age 60 or older with a gross income at or lower than $23,107 for an individual are eligible to participate in the Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program. The gross income limit for a married couple to qualify is $31,282.

Proof of age and residency are required. Older Pennsylvanians can use their driver’s license or PennDOT photo identification card to prove their age and residency.

Vouchers will be given on a first-come basis.

Seniors who are eligible can pick up their vouchers on the follow days at the identified times:

  • Monday, June 10, Loder Senior Center, 9 a.m. to noon.
  • Tuesday, June 11, Belmont Knolls, 9-11 a.m.
  • Tuesday, June 11, Knob Crest, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, June 12, Barrett Senior Center, 9 a.m. to noon.
  • Tuesday, June 18, Westgate Apartments, 9 a.m. to noon.
  • Wednesday, June 19, Hamilton Manor, 9 a.m. to noon.
  • Thursday, June 20, Avon Court, 9-11 a.m.
  • Tuesday, June 25, Shirley Futch Plaza, 9 a.m. to noon.
  • Wednesday, June 26, Oaks, Wisteria, Hawks Nest, 9 a.m. to noon.
  • Thursday, June 27, Eagle Valley, 10-11 a.m.

After this schedule has been exhausted, the Loder Senior Center will give away vouchers on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. beginning on Tuesday, July 2.

More information is available at the Monroe County Area Agency on Aging by calling 570-420-3735 or 1-800-498-0330.
 
 
Photo Display Focuses on Breast Cancer in Pennsylvania


 

A member of my district office staff on Thursday, June 6, attended a reception to kick off a new photo exhibit, “67 Women, 67 Counties: Facing Breast Cancer in Pennsylvania,” which is being displayed at the Western Pocono Community Library in cooperation with the PA Breast Cancer Coalition. The display is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on display through Saturday, June 15.
     
 
Continuing Support for PA Military, Veterans


In recognition of the service and sacrifice of active duty military and veterans in the Commonwealth, the House is always working to enact policies that help and support these men and women and their families.

This week, we approved House Bill 630 to extend Pennsylvania’s current employment protections to Pennsylvania citizens who are members of another state’s National Guard and are called up to serve outside of the Commonwealth.

We also approved House Bill 1050 to ensure an in-state tuition rate for military families as soon as a student enrolls in a public college or university, regardless of whether his or her military parent is reassigned out of the state. Both bills are now pending consideration in the Senate.

Finally, lawmakers joined with representatives of the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) to send off seven new vans that will help DAV volunteers transport veterans to their VA medical appointments.

For more information about state services and support for our military and veterans, visit the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs website at dmva.pa.gov.
   
 
Committees Examine Impacts of Medical Marijuana on Second Amendment Rights


 
The House Judiciary and Health committees held a joint public hearing this week about medical marijuana use and Second Amendment rights.

While medical marijuana use is legal under state law, it remains a violation of federal law. Federal law also prohibits anyone who is an “unlawful user” or addicted to any controlled substance from buying or owning a firearm.

Committee members heard from law enforcement officials and representatives of gun rights organizations during the hearing. Key points of the discussion included the need to better inform medical marijuana users about the impact on their Second Amendment rights and how HIPAA laws protect patients from disclosing their use of medical cannabis.

Law enforcement officials also talked about other enforcement-related issues, such as how to administer field sobriety tests on a driver suspected of using cannabis.
 
 
Bills Advance to Grow PA Agriculture


Recognizing the important contributions of the state’s agriculture industry, the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee this week approved a package of bills to support current and future farmers in the Commonwealth.

Among the bills approved by the committee are ones to create a Rapid Response Disaster Readiness Account to ensure a quick state-level response to threats such as invasive species or disease; establish a Pennsylvania Agricultural Business Development Center to help farmers create a business plan, transition plan or succession plan; and empower the State Conservation Commission to provide technical assistance and financing options for implementing best management practices.

To ensure our youth have greater exposure to and understanding of the importance of farming, other bills would revive the PA Farm-to-School Program to support child nutrition and reestablish the former Agriculture and Rural Youth Development Program to fund youth organizations that promote development in agriculture, community leadership, vocational training and peer fellowship.

Other measures aim to boost enrollment in the veteran farmer Homegrown by Heroes program, provide specialty crop block grants, aid with meat inspection costs for small or new processors and protect agritourism business from lawsuits where no party is at fault for injuries or damages.

The bills now go to the House for consideration.
 
 
Measures Aim to Improve Mental Health Care Access


 
Working to strengthen communities and support Pennsylvania families, we are continuing our efforts to improve access to behavioral health services in the Commonwealth.

House Resolution 268 directs the Joint State Government Commission (JSGC) to assess the Commonwealth’s treatment capacity for mental and behavioral health care by studying the patient care and financial impacts of delayed emergency department discharge of patients with a behavioral health diagnoses, and the cause of such delays.

A second measure, House Resolution 193, calls on JSGC to study the shortages in the mental health care workforce that are leading to delays in obtaining treatment.

The House also approved a bill to clarify current law regarding consent to mental health treatment for minor children. House Bill 672 specifically states a parent can consent to care without a minor’s approval. While this is the intent of current law, there has been confusion among parents, minors and providers about who can or must consent to care.

The bill now heads to the Senate for consideration.
 
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